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What makes a top ranked business leader?

Saturday, February 10, 2018


According to Comparably’s annual Best Places to Work 2017 list, these are the top ranked CEOs in the U.S. (for large and mid/small companies) this year.1 While startup companies are certainly different in many respects from these sizable companies, much can be learned from these individual’s and the culture which they foster.

Marc Benioff, Salesforce CEO
According to the study, Salesforce (CRM) employees gave Benioff an average score of 90 out of 100. One employee added that, “Marc drives an amazing culture through the whole organization,” while another employee said, “they care just as much, if not more, about their employees’ well-being (from health, to pay, to benefits, to happiness, to equal rights...), their community and the earth than revenue.”

Brian Halligan, HubSpot CEO
Halligan scored a 94 out of 100, citing his “down to Earth” demeanor and transparency as key factors to his high-ranking. “They all do real work. They are biased toward action,” one employee said.

Brad Smith, Intuit CEO
Smith scored a 91 out of 100, citing his ability to be “open with their plans,” and solicit info from the rest of the team,” as driving factors.

Jeff Weiner, LinkedIn CEO
Weiner scored an 86 out of 100, citing his ability to listen and be supportive to his team as driving factors. One employee said the executive team, “are doers, they don’t just delegate but jump in and take on tasks themselves when it’s needed.” 

Satya Nadella, Microsoft CEO
Microsoft (MSFT) CEO Nadella scored an 82 out of 100, citing his ability to drive culture changes at the company in a “very impressive way” and moving from a “know it all” mentality to “learn it all.”

The short version of what we can learn from these CEOs who were ranked high by their employees?

Care for employees is as important as revenue generation
Down-to-earth, “doer” type person
Biased toward action, even for themselves
Openness with everyone, soliciting information from others
Listening to others as a driving factor
Learning culture, with a “know it all” culture not tolerated

Best and worst CEOs of 2017, by Jade Scipioni.  Published December 29, 2017 Career FOXBusiness.


Larry Sharp, Director of Training, IBEC Ventures

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